Bottom paint solution

Bottom paint solution

When Summer Dance got beat up in a freak storm this summer, the damage was mainly in two areas. The first area was the deck rim and the rubrail, for which I described the repairs in Storm damage repairs. The second area was the bottom paint, which also got hammered as you can see in the following picture. In some areas, the top layer of paint was knocked off and exposed an underlying layer. In other areas, it was knocked off completely down to the fiberglass. Whether it was knocked off directly by the impact of the waves or because of the hull flexing and vibrating from getting repeatedly hit broadside by waves and slammed against the dock, I don’t know. It needed fixed all the same, so it was included in the insurance claim.

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Storm damage repairs

Storm damage repairs

After Summer Dance was badly damaged in a freak storm, the first mate and I doubted whether we would get her back in the water before the end of the sailing season. I didn’t know how I was going to fix her, whether I could do the work, or whether our insurance claim would pay enough to have the work done professionally. The DIYer in me wanted to save money and learn how to lay up fiberglass. But looking at the complexity of the damage and how long it would take a novice like me to fix it only reinforced the reality that if we wanted to sail again this year, the damage would have to be repaired by professionals.
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Under V berth storage

Under V berth storage solution

I began solving our onboard storage dilemma back in March with the Under galley storage solution. This project is a repeat of that one but for the unused space under the V berth, specifically on the starboard side next to the portable toilet. It’s also different in that I used different wood for this project. The first door that I made was out of stained Philippine mahogany. I made this one from Honduran mahogany with an oil and polyurethane finish instead of stain. The result is almost indistinguishable from teak, as you can see below.

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